In Brief: German Association of Cities and Municipalities speaks out against proposed motorcycle ban on Sundays

The idea behind the proposed ban is to ease noise pollution. Instead, the association is calling for better enforcement of existing laws governing speeding and motorcycle exhaust systems.

Photo by: fotografierende, Unsplash

By Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson, William Glucroft and Dina Elsayed

The German Association of Cities and Municipalities is speaking out against a proposed ban on riding motorcycles on Sundays to ease noise pollution.

Instead, the association is calling for better enforcement of existing laws governing speeding and motorcycle exhaust systems.

Last Sunday, thousands of motorcycle enthusiasts protested the ban proposed by Germany’s upper house of parliament.

The riding actions were held across the country and were organized by the Facebook group, “Biker for Freedom.”

***

More people are leaving Berlin for the surrounding countryside than moving in.

Nearly twice as many Berliners left for Brandenburg in 2019 than the other way around. That’s according to data from the Berlin-Brandenburg Statistics Office, and is similar to what happened the year before.

Public broadcaster rbb reported almost 18,000 people left Brandenburg last year for Berlin, while nearly 35,000 went the other way.

The population increased for both states when factoring in those who came from outside the region. Berlin and Brandenburg each saw a net addition of about 23,000 people in 2019.

***

Complaints against Berlin police officers are down from last year.

Civilians filed 1,820 complaints against the Berlin police department in 2019. That’s 46 fewer complaints than the previous year.

According to news agency dpa, the complaints mostly criticized officers’ behavior or their failure to act. Fourteen of them involved racism and two, sex discrimination.

Just over a tenth of the complaints were deemed “legitimate” by the Berlin police department.

The new stats were published by the Berlin Senate.

This news is brought to you in cooperation with Berliner Rundfunk.

Whether it’s our coverage of the coronavirus, rent freezes or more light-hearted subjects like Berlin’s pandas, you can count us for factual and informative content. We are the go-to source for the English-as-a-common-language community in Berlin and beyond. The pandemic will challenge us to find new ways of doing reporting, but we will continue to bring you the programming you love and news you can trust. We are a listener-funded public radio station, driven by donors like you. So please consider donating today to keep us on air, online and in your community.