In Brief: Chancellor Merkel in self-quarantine after her doctor tests positive for the coronavirus

The news of the German chancellor’s self-quarantine came just after she announced nine new rules to curb the spread of the virus, including limiting gatherings to no more than two people unless they live in the same household.

Photo by Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

By Sylvia Cunningham and Soraya Sarhaddi Nelson

 

Chancellor Angela Merkel is in self-quarantine after a doctor who vaccinated her against pneumonia-causing bacteria on Friday tested positive for the coronavirus. 

A government spokesman said in a statement the chancellor would continue working from home and would be tested regularly in the coming days.

The news came after Merkel announced nine new rules to curb the spread of the virus, including limiting gatherings to no more than two people unless they live in the same household.

“Do what is right for our country,” Merkel said in her appeal to the public. “Show sense and compassion.”

The new rules still allow people to go to work or doctors’ appointments, shop for groceries and order takeout food. You can find the full list here.

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Clinical trials for a COVID-19 treatment have started in eight European countries. 

Four different drugs that scientists hope can be used to treat those infected with the coronavirus are to be tested on roughly 3,200 people.

The medicines being tested include a drug combination that is used against HIV, malaria treatments and a once promising Ebola treatment.

The test subjects, who have the coronavirus, are currently hospitalized in Germany, the U.K., Spain, France, Belgium, the Netherlands, Luxembourg and Sweden.

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A BVG spokesman says fewer trains, buses and trams are running in Berlin in response to a decrease in demand because of the coronavirus health crisis.

He told KCRW Berlin there’s been an up to 50 percent drop in passengers compared to the same time in previous years.

The spokesman added the BVG will be running trains in no longer than 10-minute intervals in order not to leave those who can’t telecommute hanging.

 This news is brought to you in cooperation with Berliner Rundfunk.  

For up-to-date information on what you should be doing to help stop the spread of the coronavirus, check our fact sheet. 

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