In Brief: Bundestag approves changes to the federal government’s climate package

The compromise provides for carbon dioxide emissions to become significantly more expensive than initially planned by the Grand Coalition. In return, citizens are to receive a higher commuter allowance, and lower prices on tickets for long-distance trains.

Photo by Sebastian Herrmann on Unsplash

 

 

Germany’s Bundestag has approved changes to the federal government’s climate package.

The compromise provides for carbon dioxide emissions to become significantly more expensive than initially planned by the Grand Coalition. In return, citizens are to receive a higher commuter allowance, and lower prices on tickets for long-distance trains. The compromise drew criticism from the FDP’s Christian Dürr.

Dürr said the majority of commuters in Germany won’t receive relief from the agreed compromise, but instead they will be burdened by higher fuel costs.

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For 4 years now, there has been a ban on conversion of apartments in Berlin’s Milieuschutzgebieten, or protected social areas.

The designation of such spaces is meant to maintain social diversity, particularly if an area receives rapid development and investments.

It is more difficult to convert rental apartments in milieu protected areas, though there are many exceptions to the law. According to the city’s department of development, these exceptions are often used.

Senator for Urban Development and Housing Katrin Lompscher says last year, nearly 13,000 rental apartments were converted into private property. That was about 3500 fewer flats than the year before.

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The European Court of Justice has ruled for the first time on whether courts can detain politicians who fail to take actions to enforce EU law.

The case came about after the watchdog group, Environmental Action Germany, sued the state of Bavaria for failing to improve air quality in violation of EU health regulations. The group called for jail time for Bavaria’s State Premier, Markus Söder.

In Luxembourg on Thursday, the EU Court of Justice decided that compulsory detention could only be imposed if there was a legal basis in Germany.  

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