In Brief: Following fatal crash in Mitte, some German politicians call for limit on SUVs in inner cities

The exact cause of Friday’s fatal crash is not yet clear but the case is being investigated as involuntary manslaughter. Police say the driver of the vehicle, a 42-year-old man, drove onto the sidewalk at the corner of Invalidenstraße and Ackerstraße just after 7 p.m.

Photo by Jeff Sheldon on Unsplash

 

 

Some German politicians are calling for new restrictions on SUVs after a car accident in Berlin Mitte left four dead, including a 3-year-old boy.

Deputy chairman of the Greens Oliver Krischer told Der Tagesspiegel an “upper limit” on SUVs in inner cities is needed.

The exact cause of Friday’s fatal crash is not yet clear but the case is being investigated as involuntary manslaughter. Police say the driver of the vehicle, a 42-year-old man, drove onto the sidewalk at the corner of Invalidenstraße and Ackerstraße just after 7 p.m.

On Saturday there was a vigil where attendees observed four minutes of silence, one minute for each victim.

Police are in the process of interviewing witnesses and reviewing video footage of the incident.

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An analysis by the Bertelsmann Stiftung finds in the coming years, the teacher shortage in German primary schools will be greater than previously thought.

By 2025, the report predicts there will be an additional need for at least 26,300 teachers, 11,000 more than previously predicted by the Kultusministerkonferenz, the standing conference of education ministers across Germany.

The Bertelsmann Stiftung says the discrepancy could be due to the fact that there are new numbers out on how many primary school children there will actually be in 2025.

Previously, it was predicted there would be about three million primary students by 2025. Now Germany’s Federal Statistical Office predicts there will be more than 3.2 million.

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Though it’s still four months away, New Year’s Eve was on the agenda at the Berlin parliament on Monday.

There is a ban planned on fireworks at two spots in the city, at the northern part of Alexanderplatz and on Pallasstraße in Schöneberg. Private fireworks are also not permitted at the Brandenburg Gate.

The Berlin Senate is also hoping to amend federal law to limit the sale of fireworks to one or two days.

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