In Brief: Germany’s top court rules that rent control measure ‘Mietpreisbremse’ is constitutional

A judge has ruled it’s in the public interest to counteract the displacement of people from the city’s most sought-after districts, specifically those who are in less fortunate economic situations.

Photo by Mollie Lemm

 

The Federal Constitutional Court has ruled that the rent control measure known as the “Mietpreisbremse” is constitutional. Germany’s top court thereby rejects the complaint of a landlord from Berlin. She’ll now have to pay money back to tenants whom she overcharged.

The Mietpreisbremse is designed to protect tenants. The general idea is if tenants are being charged more than 10% above the average rent in certain areas, they can take it up with their landlord.

The judge ruled it’s in the public interest to counteract the displacement of people from the city’s most sought-after districts, specifically those who are in less fortunate economic situations.

Here in Berlin, this rent control measure has been in place for four years. Lawmakers recently talked about extending the measure another five years, through 2025.

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On Tuesday, the people’s initiative Klimanotstand presented a petition with more than 43,000 signatures to the Berlin parliament. The activists behind the initiative are urging Berlin to declare a climate emergency.

One of the initiators, Markus Dörre, said lawmakers should act now. He said we are already in a climate crisis, and it should be called out in politics for what it is.

Just last week, Potsdam declared a climate emergency, meaning the city will make decisions with climate change in mind.

 

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